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Election guide for kids: Why is everyone talking about voting?

Tribune News Service logoTribune News Service 10/31/2020 By Gwendolyn Havern, iGeneration Youthe
a group of people that are talking to each other: A child and supporters listen as Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden speaks during a drive-in campaign rally in the parking lot of Cellairis Ampitheatre on Oct. 27, 2020 in Atlanta, Georgia. © Drew Angerer/Getty Images North America/TNS A child and supporters listen as Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden speaks during a drive-in campaign rally in the parking lot of Cellairis Ampitheatre on Oct. 27, 2020 in Atlanta, Georgia.

2020 is an exciting year. With the election coming up, people all over America are preparing to vote. You might hear talk of “parties,” “vice president” or “terms.” What is voting, though, and why do Americans vote?

Voting is pretty common. Think about when you’re about to go to dinner. Your parents might say “Pizza or burger?” Your family might then decide where to go based on what the majority, or most, vote for. A slice of pizza isn’t necessarily better than a burger, but it might still win because it’s cheaper, local or maybe you ate burgers last night.

Every four years, people of the United States from all backgrounds vote on the leader of our country. The candidates are mostly from two parties: Republican and Democratic. Parties are political groups that share the same values. This includes government officials as well as voters themselves. Voters elect candidates to represent them in government. In this year’s presidential race, Joe Biden represents the Democrats while President Donald Trump represents the Republicans.

Biden has served in government for decades He was Barack Obama’s vice president, and before that he served as senator from Delaware. Before becoming Delaware’s longest-serving senator, Biden attended the University of Delaware and was inspired by John F. Kennedy to pursue political science before becoming a lawyer. After college, Biden married Neilia Hunter. They had four kids: Hunter, Ashley, Beau and Naomi. Unfortunately, during an automobile incident in 1972, Neilia and his daughter Naomi died. Despite this, Biden continued working in public office and now seeks to be president.

a little boy that is holding a sign: A boy holds a sign in support of U.S. President Donald Trump during a Make America Great Again rally with Vice President Mike Pence at Greensboro International Airport, in Greensboro, North Carolina on Oct. 27, 2020. © GRANT BALDWIN/Getty Images North America/TNS A boy holds a sign in support of U.S. President Donald Trump during a Make America Great Again rally with Vice President Mike Pence at Greensboro International Airport, in Greensboro, North Carolina on Oct. 27, 2020.

His running mate is Kamala Harris. A running mate is the candidate’s pick for whom they want as their vice president if elected. Harris is a lawyer and a former prosecutor and state attorney general before becoming a senator from California in 2017. If elected, she would be the first woman to serve as vice president.

President Trump is the Republican nominee. Before 2016, he worked as a businessman, mostly handling beauty pageants, reality shows and his real estate company. In 2016, he was elected as the 45th U.S. president after beating former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. Trump married his third wife, Melania, in 2005. He has five children: Donald Jr., Ivanka, Eric, Tiffany and Barron. His older children are an active part of his campaign, and all five and Melania are considered the “first family,” the name given to the active president’s immediate relatives.


Video: Early voters head to the polls (ABC News)

Trump’s vice president, Mike Pence, was formerly the governor of Indiana and in his early career served in the U.S. House of Representatives.

On Nov. 3, Americans will vote for either Biden or Trump, in the meantime both candidates campaign in various states, meeting with other members of their party and winning over voters (hopefully).

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ABOUT THE WRITER

Gwendolyn Havern is an iGeneration Youth reporter living in Pennsylvania, USA. Read more stories at igenerationyouth.com.

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©2020 Tribune Content Agency, LLC

Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

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